Monday, October 23, 2017

Shut In



It's actually a curious story how a Methodist (nonconformist) missionary and his family wound up interred in St. Multose's Church of Ireland cemetery, testament to the ecumenism of the early 20th century. A curious turn of phrase, too, with "eternally shut in". 


14 comments:

  1. Looks also that an older stone is placed on a new one and the last sentence on the upper stone is written by someone else as the text before.

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  2. The family must have had true Irish roots.

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  3. ...there's a lot to learn in a cemetery, but only if they could talk.

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  4. Quite a bit of information on this stone. Interesting.

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  5. This certainly raises more questions than it answers. I've known a lot of missionaries in my life (some were relatives) and while I didn't agree with their ambition to convert the world to their way of thinking they did have incredible drive and perseverance and truly tried to love the objects of their missionary efforts.

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  6. I have never heard that expression before either. Whoever engraved the stone did a good job fitting all the information on it.

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  7. There is a whole family history on that stone!

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  8. I have not seen those words before.
    Wonderful what can be seen in a cemetery.

    All the best Jan

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  9. Gravestones can tell so many stories. I love wandering around cemeteries reading the names.

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  10. It's truly inspiring to visit cemeteries and discover bits and pieces of the lives they once led and other interesting facts. Even the meaning of objects on their tombstones. Like lambs for young children.

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